analytics
July 19, 2013

Complex gas and electricity bills are leaving consumers flummoxed, according to the latest research from Uswitch, a consumers’ grapple with confusing terminology, reams of facts and figures and the confusion over estimated readings.

But while the last twelve months has seen gas and electricity users being overcharged a staggering £6.7 billion on their energy costs because of the complex nature of their billing, home heating oil users may be breathing a sigh of relief that they won’t suffer the same fate. Here’s why.

One simple charge: Unlike energy bill readings for electricity, heating oil bills won’t be filled with kilowatt hours or cubic feet to calculate how much energy your have consumed. Heating oil users simply pay a price per gallon or gallons of oil, and aren’t hit with any further costs after this point.

Commenting on the plight facing gas and electricity users, Ann Robinson, director of consumer policy at Uswitch.com, said: “Consumers are spending thousands of pounds a year on household bills.  They need to be sure that what they are paying is correct.

“It shouldn’t take rocket science to do so. In this day and age, clear and concise bills should be the very least that consumers should expect. The fact that some companies and industries are still unable to get this fundamental part of their service right is simply unacceptable.”

No standing charge: While a standing charge is included by some gas and electricity bills, with the charge used to cover the costs of maintain your supply, this does not apply to heating oil.

Paying upfront: Heating oil users normally pay for their heating oil supply at the time of ordering. This means that they won’t be surprised by a hefty heating bill at the end of the month or quarter.

Heating oil users can help bring down their costs without switching: Heating oil users can help to bring down their heating costs in a number of simple ways without the need to switch tariffs or suppliers. This includes ordering larger quantities of heating oil to bring down the price per litre, and buying heating oil during the summer when demand is traditionally lower.


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